We all have someone in our family we might accuse of tone deafness; it might be a little cousin whose vocals chords haven’t fully developed, or an embarrassing dad trying to hit the high notes in a Queen song. No matter who it is, we might wish they would just stop singing; after all, they can’t carry a tune through a paper bag! Here’s a question for you, though: when you call them on the phone, do they know who it is based on your voice? When a song comes on, do they recognize it? Are they really tone deaf?

Tone deafness, clinically known as amusia, comes in two forms: congenital and acquired. Acquired amusia is as a result of brain damage, and is often coupled with other problems. Congenital amusia, conversely, affects only about 4% of the population. It’s a bizarre occurrence, because it does not affect the ability to distinguish between voices and emotions in human speech; it only affects the ability to recognize facets of music. A person with congenital amusia would not be able to recognize an out-of-place note in an unfamiliar melody; they can’t differentiate between dissonance and consonance.

At first glance, this appears totally out of the ordinary; after all, if they can distinguish pitches when people are speaking to them, shouldn’t they simply be able to learn music? Here’s where things get interesting: infants are incredibly sensitive to music at a very young age. They can appreciate musical scales, and they understand concepts of consonance and dissonance. That means most people come pre-equipped with an ability to process and appreciate music, unless you’re in the unlucky 4% who truly can’t pick out one melody from another.

That means if you can hear music, understand consonance and dissonance and appreciate a good melody, you’re probably not tone-deaf at all! You just need to train your ear and your voice to better pick out and sing notes, and this is something that can be done with a healthy dose of practice. You can test this out yourself; when someone else sings a note, try to sing the same note as them, or try to sing the same note being played from a piano! If you can, you’re not tone-deaf, just out of practice. After you get some experience, you’ll be astounded by the things you can do from your voice; you’ll be able to find harmonies everywhere, and create beautiful melodies on a whim.

Folks who feel like they’re tone deaf are often shy about performing in public. That might cause them to avoid music lessons. We wanted to solve that problem; after all, if you love music, there should be no barrier between you and getting better. To do this, we’ve created a plethora of quality and affordable in-home music lessons, so that you can practice in the comfort of your own space and develop your skills before you take it to the big times.